Helping Parents with Loss – Looking At Myth 6 – Corporate Grief and Grief in the Classroom

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Corporate Grief and Grief in the Classroom

When working in Corporate America, let’s say you fall down and suffer a severely broken arm.  You might get four to six weeks off work with disability pay.

What happens when your mom dies, or your husband, or brother, or child?

Nationally accepted average of time off

What is the nationally accepted average of time off to deal with the overwhelming feelings caused by the death of a loved one?  The answer: three days!  Yes, three days, for a broken heart caused by the death of a loved one.  Yet several weeks off for a broken arm.  Is it possible that our priorities are a little bit out of whack?

If societal accepted ideas imply that you should be back at your desk four days after the death of a loved one, looking good and being productive, then the myth that time is the element in recovery is reinforced.  It makes very little sense that someone might be able so quickly to recover his or her equilibrium following the death of a loved one.  yet, the idea of “instant recovery” adds a burden so powerful that many grieving people are inclined to say “I’m fine,” even though they are drowning in a sea of sorrow.

Grief in the Classroom

While we have used the adult-oriented example of time off from a job, we ask you to consider this notion as it applies to your children.  Are the same kinds of ideas used in the workplace also used in the school setting?

Can it be that our are children expected to be back in class,  bright-eyed, cheery, and productive only a few days after a shattered loss?  Sadly, this is often true.

We know that teachers are required to have skill and awareness in many academic and administrative areas.  Each of which can be important to the well-being of children.  But we also know that teachers are bound to interact with grieving children on a regular basis.  Therefore, we believe that schoolteachers, counselors, and administrators can benefit greatly from, “When Children Grieve.”

From the book.  . When Children Grieve written by John W James  and Russell Friedman with Dr. Leslie Landon Matthews

There is help . .

If you are interested in participating in the Renew Your Possibility – As Children Grieve 6 week Study group, sign up here.

This is a complimentary study group that will provide you some incredibly valuable safety tips and tools that you will be able to use for the rest of your life and your children’s lives.  I guarantee it.

Or, if you are not ready to take that step, purchase the book “When Children Grieve here . .

Or download one of the ebooks under the resources page and read up on grief.

Another option is to Schedule a 15 minute complimentary call to share what your experiencing so you can ask me questions.

Just take that first step.  Do something that you have not done before.  It’s ok, that your not ok, yet please don’t stay stuck in grief.  There is light on the other side.

Remember, “The beginning is the most important part of the work.” Plato

Yours in Gratitude and to Renewing Your Possibility. . .

Debbie  Your Grief Recovery Specialist®